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Cost Savers

Energy Tip: Measuring Your Home’s Energy Efficiency

If your home is losing energy, you’re losing money. So, how can you know if your home is energy efficient? You can do a simple DIY energy assessment, or call an auditor or local utility for a professional assessment. Here are tips to get you started.
Caulking Window Crackso to Save Energy in Home

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If your home is losing energy, you’re losing money. So, how can you tell if your home is energy efficient? You can do a simple do-it-yourself energy assessment, or call an energy auditor or local utility for a professional assessment. Here are some tips to get you started.

Energy.gov makes these suggestions for a DIY energy assessment:

  • Check the insulation in your attic, exterior and basement walls, ceilings, floors and crawl spaces.
  • Check for air leaks around your walls, ceilings, doors windows, lighting and plumbing fixtures, switches and electrical outlets.
  • Check for open fireplace dampers.
  • Properly maintain your heating and cooling systems. Check your owner’s manuals for maintenance recommendations.
For a more advanced energy assessment, Energy.gov suggests contacting a professional energy auditor. Using special equipment, he will check for air leaks, look for areas with insufficient insulation and pinpoint malfunctioning equipment. The energy auditor will then analyze how well your home’s energy systems work together and compare his analysis to your utility bills. You’ll receive his recommendations for making cost-effective energy improvements.
 
HERS Index Score With the growing consumer demand for energy efficient homes, Residential Energy Services Network, a California-based nonprofit, created the national training and certification standards for rating a home’s efficiency. Known as the HERS Index, it is recognized by several federal government agencies like the Department of Energy.

A HERS Index Score compares a home’s energy efficiency to similar homes. The lower the HERS Index Score, the more energy efficient the home. The HERS Index Score offers consumers a way to comparison-shop for homes, and helps homeowners identify the energy efficiency of their home.

To get a HERS Index Score, you need to schedule a home energy rating with a certified RESNET Home Energy Rater. Get a home energy rating.

Whichever method you choose, determining your energy efficiency rating can help save you money and create a more comfortable home.

 

  • Did You Know?
    You could potentially save 5% - 30% on your energy bill by making upgrades to reduce air leaks (drafts) following a home-energy assessment. (SOURCE: Energy.gov)

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