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Real Estate

How to Deal With Difficult Clients

Let’s face it ─ we all have days where we’re difficult to be around. While most of your client interactions are likely positive and rewarding, sometimes clients can seem difficult for a variety of reasons. People can be short-tempered, demanding, chronically late, picky, confrontational, or unreliable. Occasionally a client will seem difficult simply because their personality or perspective differs from your own. In those rare instances, here are some tips to remember:

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Don’t take things personally.

A client’s mood or behavior seldom has anything to do with yours. Perhaps the person has had a hard day or encountered a problem before they interacted with you. Try not to internalize their words, opinions, or actions. Always maintain a professional demeanor, be objective, and respond with patience and good humor.

 

Listen.

Sometimes a challenging client simply wants to be heard. When a client lashes out at you or at a situation, calmly ask questions to try to get to the root of what’s really bothering them. You may be surprised to find that the real issue wasn’t what you originally suspected.

 

Use email and text messages to communicate when you can.

Putting things in writing gives you the opportunity to choose your words carefully and express yourself without interruption. Use email and text messages to follow up on phone calls and personal conversations to clarify points and for a written record of grievances, requests, and actions.

 

Send reminders.

If clients are consistently late or unreliable, send text messages or call to remind them about specific appointment times. They’ll appreciate the prompts and won’t have an excuse for missing showings or meetings.

 

Seek advice. 

Talk to trusted colleagues, brokers, and friends for help and advice. People who have strong interpersonal skills and experience have likely encountered issues like the ones you face, and can offer helpful suggestions and share what’s worked for them.

 

Practice self care.

Regardless of the circumstances, dealing with difficult people can be stressful. Take breaks, pursue hobbies, spend time with friends and family, and practice relaxation techniques to help you cope in a healthy manner.

 

With an American Home Shield® Home Warranty, sellers, and buyers have a repair resource to contact when covered items break down instead of calling and complaining to you. American Home Shield coverage can also help reassure buyers and offer important budget protection that can help make them feel more secure about their purchase decisions.

 

It’s also helpful to remember that some real estate transactions simply take more time, effort, and skill to complete than others. While difficult clients may require additional attention and energy, successful transactions can be worth the extra work. With perseverance, patience, and professionalism, you may even turn difficult clients into repeat clients.


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